Spinach and Feta Spanakopita Triangles: My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2 Family Dinner

Sometimes my dad gets on these kicks where he discovers a book or a movie and he will buy all us kids a copy of the book or harass us until we finally see the movie. The summer after my husband and I got married, my dad started up again–these were the days before group texts, so instead, it was all the emails. And the phone calls. “Have you seen My Big Fat Greek Wedding yet??” Two days later: “Have you seen my movie yet?!” Finally, after a few weeks of being pestered (and as the pestering was starting from everyone else in my life), we went to see it and we loved it. So much of it rang true for us–two people from very different backgrounds getting married and all the loud, crazy family drama. And, almost 14 years later, we still laugh about the Windex and the aunt’s discovery of the twin. So when we saw this trailer and realized there was going to be a My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2 (it hits theaters March 25!), I had all the feels and I was just so excited.


  It was like seeing old friends again…

My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2

and Ian and Toula looked happy and they were still married and in this world full of cynicism and sadness, that made me happy.

My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2

In anticipation of My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2, I decided to introduce my kids to the original movie last week. I was surprised at how sweet and funny it still is and my kids loved it just as much as I did. And one of the things I’ve always loved about this movie is how everything is centered around food and family (because, let’s face it, so is my life), I decided to get Greek in the kitchen. One of my favorite Greek dishes is spanakopita (a spinach and feta pie with a flaky phyllo dough crust)–you can make it as a whole pie or you can make little individual triangles. I prefer the triangles because they seem to be less heavy and they’re perfect for party appetizers or to serve a crowd for brunch. Once you get the hang of folding them, they don’t take long to make, especially if you have lots of helpers.

Celebrate the release of My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2 with Spanakopita Triangles from Our Best Bites

For the filling, you’re going to need 10-11 ounces of fresh baby spinach, a 12-ounce container of crumbled feta cheese, a stick of butter (you may end up needing a little more), about 10 sheets of phyllo dough (you may end up using more) and an egg (if you prefer; if I’m making these as an appetizer, I like it better without, but if you’re serving it for a meal, an egg will give it a little more substance.)

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You’re also going to add all sorts of flavorful things like garlic, chopped green onions, some fresh dill, some lemon juice, and some salt and pepper.

spanakopita triangles

In a large pot with high sides, heat 1 tablespoon butter over medium heat. Add garlic and green onions and cook 2-3 minutes, until tender and fragrant. Add the spinach and top with the lid to the pot. When the spinach has cooked down enough to be able to stir it, stir frequently to help break it down and to prevent scorching. Cook until the spinach has completely cooked down and most of the liquid has evaporated. Remove from heat.
Add the salt, pepper, dill, lemon juice, and feta and stir to combine. Add the egg (if desired)  and combine thoroughly. Set aside.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Melt the remaining butter. Now…if you’ve never worked with phyllo dough before, it’s not nearly as intimidating as it sounds. You’ll find it in the freezer section of your grocery store (near the pie crusts) and you’ll just want to set it one roll on the counter a few hours before you make this recipe (or pop it in the refrigerator the day before.) It is tissue-thin…

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and, especially when layered and brushed with butter, it puffs into a unbelievably flaky, melt-in-your-mouth pastry. 

Place one sheet of phyllo dough on a clean work surface, the long side facing you, and cover the remaining dough with a lightly damp paper towel (you need to keep it a little moist or it will start breaking, but if it’s too wet, it will stick together and tear). Brush the surface of the dough with melted butter, then place another sheet on top of the first sheet and brush that sheet with butter. Using a pizza cutter, cut the dough into 5 equal pieces (about 2.5-3″ wide). Place 1 scant tablespoon of the spinach-feta filling at the bottom of each portion.

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Fold the corner of the the dough over the filling, forming a triangle, then continue folding triangles (like you would fold a flag)

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and place the triangles, seam side down, on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Repeat with remaining strips and then the remaining phyllo dough and feta filling.

Brush the triangles with butter and bake for 20-25 minutes or until golden brown. Cool for about 10 minutes before serving.

Celebrate the release of My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2 with Spanakopita Triangles from Our Best Bites

Spanakopita Triangles
Flaky, buttery phyllo dough is stuffed with a savory spinach and feta cheese mixture in this traditional Greek savory pastry.
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Ingredients
  1. 1-2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  2. 1/2 cup (1 stick) butter
  3. 1 10-11-ounce package baby spinach
  4. 1 clove garlic, minced
  5. 3 green onions, chopped
  6. 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  7. 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  8. 1 teaspoon fresh chopped dill
  9. Juice of 1 lemon
  10. 1 12-ounce carton crumbled feta cheese
  11. 1 egg, beaten (optional; see note)
  12. 10 sheets phyllo dough (more if necessary)
Instructions
  1. In a large pot with high sides, heat 1-2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil over medium heat. Add garlic and green onions and cook 2-3 minutes, until tender and fragrant. Add the spinach and top with the lid to the pot. When the spinach has cooked down enough to be able to stir it, stir frequently to help break it down and to prevent scorching. Cook until the spinach has completely cooked down and most of the liquid has evaporated. Remove from heat.
  2. Add the salt, pepper, dill, lemon juice, and feta and stir to combine. Add the egg and combine thoroughly. Set aside.
  3. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Melt the remaining butter. Place one sheet of phyllo dough on a clean work surface, the long side facing you, and cover the remaining dough with a lightly damp paper towel. Brush the surface of the dough with melted butter, then place another sheet on top of the first sheet and brush that sheet with butter. Using a pizza cutter, cut the dough into 5 equal pieces (about 2.5-3" wide). Place 1 scant tablespoon of the spinach-feta filling at the bottom of each portion. Fold the corner of the the dough over the filling, forming a triangle, then continue folding triangles (like you would fold a flag) and place the triangles, seam side down, on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Repeat with remaining strips and then the remaining phyllo dough and feta filling.
  4. Brush the triangles with butter and bake for 20-25 minutes or until golden brown.
Notes
  1. Adding an egg is optional here. For appetizers, I prefer it without, but if you're serving it as a meal, it adds some bulk and protein.
  2. Once you get the hang of folding the dough, it moves very quickly. This is a great recipe for lots of helpers in the kitchen, even little helpers!
Our Best Bites http://ourbestbites.com/
 This post is in partnership with Universal Pictures, but the recipe, original photographs, and opinions are our own.

10 comments

  1. These triangles look fantastic! My parents spent a month in Greece and brought me back “the famous Greek Dress” I can’t leave my house wearing it without almost every. Single. Woman. I pass begged to ask where I got it from! It IS stunning. I tried to order another online and the website in in Greek so I can’t figure out how!!!

    1. Copy the website url and then put it into translate.google.com. It will translate as much as it can for you into English. I’m sure it isn’t 100% accurate but it may work so you can get your dress. 🙂

    2. Go to the Greek language department at your local university and someone will help you. If there’s no Greek department, try the theology department – many religious scholars learn Greek, Hebrew and Latin so they can read works in those languages.
      The other option is the Greek embassy or consulate if there’s one near you. You want to buy their country’s product which they encourage – especially if you tell them that you will pass the info on to others.

  2. Spanakopita is my favorite Greek food (aside from gyros of course)! So super excited to make these even though my kids will not eat them. More for me! 🙂

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