Fizzy Peppermint Bath Salts

Fizzy Bath Salts are incredibly easy to make, pretty inexpensive, and nearly impossible to mess up! It’s a great thing to make for yourself, and they make a terrific holiday gift. (Of course I have a free printable you can use!). The only ingredients you’ll need are epsom salts (they’re widely available at drugstores, grocery stores, and Target-like places), peppermint essential oil (you don’t need anything fancy or expensive, I buy mine on amazon), baking soda, and citric acid. Citric acid can be found on Amazon, or often in stores like Walmart or even home improvement stores. It’s used in home canning and preserving, cleaning, and bath and beauty products. With all of these ingredients, you can also make some of my favorite Peppermint Sink Scrub!

I highly recommend slapping on a pair of rubber gloves while you make this–any residual moisture on your hands will make the salts fizz prematurely and if you have any tiny cuts or scratches or irritations on your hands, the straight-up citric acid isn’t going to make them feel better (don’t worry, it’ll be fine in the tub, partially because it’s diluted and partially because the fizzy reaction is actually the baking soda neutralizing the acid. Science, yo.)

Instructions

Pour the salts into a large and completely dry bowl. If you’re going to use food coloring, you’ll add it now. I actually like to make this without coloring. A fun idea if you’re not using food coloring is to put the plain white mixture in a pink jar! If you do want to add color (it’s super cute, pink) I don’t like to add a lot because I don’t want to cause any problems leaving a film on my or anyone’s tub. So maybe just go light on that. But do keep in mind that whatever color you have at this point will be diluted a bit since you’ve still got more ingredients to add. I went for a super pale pink in this batch. You’ll also add the essential oil at this point and mix in really well until completely combined.

Next you’ll add in the baking soda and the citric acid and mix until it’s completely combined. I like to use my hands, and I wear gloves. Transfer into containers. Note: I always keep these in glass jars. Someone commented that mixtures containing baking soda and citric acid can react and cause the glass to break or even explode if the mixture is introduced to moisture, which is good to know! I’ve never had that issue but I thought it was worth noting here to be aware, especially when stored in a bathroom where it could get wet. If you live in a particularly humid climate, or are worried about your ability to keep the mixture itself dry before using, it might be better to put in a breathable container, or plastic.

To use: You can use 1-2 cups of these salts if you’re doing a therapeutic epsom salt bath (epsom salts are actually a form of magnesium and, when you soak in them, some of the magnesium absorbs through your skin. Magnesium is great for aches, sprains, bruises, muscle cramps, and relaxation. Funny side note: I am a terrible sleeper and my doctor had me start taking a magnesium supplement at night. After a year of every prescription and over-the-counter sleep medication on the market, it is the only thing that helps me fall asleep and stay asleep, plus I don’t send weird texts or buy $300 worth of stuff from Etsy like when I take Ambien.) If you’d rather just add something fun and yummy-smelling to your bath, you can just use a few tablespoons.

Tie a cute string around it and add a label and you’ve got cute gifts for all your girlfriends!

Fizzy Peppermint Bath Salts

A fizzy, soothing, refreshing mix to drop into warm bath water.

Ingredients

  • 3 cups epsom salts
  • 1/2 teaspoon red or pink food coloring optional
  • 20 drops peppermint essential oil
  • 2 cups baking soda
  • 1 cup citric acid

Instructions

  • I recommend using gloves.
  • Pour the salts into a large and completely dry bowl. Add food coloring and essential oil and  mix until completely combined. Add the baking soda and mix until combined. Add the citric acid and combine.  Divide into airtight containers (glass is preferable).
  • To use: You can use an entire cup of these salts if you’re doing a therapeutic epsom salt bath, or you can use a few tablespoons if you just want something to add to your bath.
  • Edited to add: If you live in a dry climate, allow these to dry for a few hours before packing them up. If you live in a humid climate, you may want to try blow drying them on low for a few minutes to remove any excess moisture and then packaging them immediately.

Notes

Note: I always keep these in glass jars. Someone commented that mixtures containing baking soda and citric acid can react and cause the glass to break or even explode if the mixture is introduced to moisture, which is good to know! I've never had that issue but I thought it was worth noting here to be aware, especially when stored in a bathroom where it could get wet. If you live in a particularly humid climate, or are worried about your ability to keep the mixture itself dry before using, it might be better to put in a breathable container, or plastic. A cellophane bag with a ribbon or twist tie would be a good option as well.  I just purchased these shaker lids, which I think is a great solution!
Author: Sara Wells
Did You Make This Recipe?Snap a picture, and hashtag it #ourbestbites. We love to see your creations on our Instagram @ourbestbites!

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Meet The Author

Sara Wells

Sara Wells co-founded Our Best Bites in 2008. She is the author of three Bestselling Cook Books, Best Bites: 150 Family Favorite RecipesSavoring the Seasons with Our Best Bites, and 400 Calories or Less from Our Best Bites. Sara’s work has been featured in many local and national news outlets and publications such as Parenting MagazineBetter Homes & GardensFine CookingThe Rachel Ray Show and the New York Times.

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Questions & Reviews

  1. Love, love LOVE this as a homemade gift idea! As soon as Amazon delivers the citric acid, I’ll be making a batch
    of the Peppermint and one of lemon eucalyptus!
    All I need now are those cute lables…Will you please email?
    Thanks!

  2. Love how these turn out and they seem so inexpensive to make! Thank you for sharing how you did this. These will make fantastic neighbor gifts.

  3. Hey has any one considered putting a oxygen pack in on top before closing? Especially if you make these well in advance or wish to keep them long term, would keep moisture out. What do you think?

    1. You *can*, but it will probably have an alcohol-ish odor and it won’t be as potent.

  4. I haven’t been able to find citric acid anywhere so would it be possible to use cream of tart? I saw a recipe earlier and was wondering if it can be used with this too?

  5. Hysterical post.
    The Ambien comment hits pretty close to home.
    Actually, I think I texted you once when I was on Ambien – no typos or anything, which is odd as I typos like mad when awake.
    My wife appreciates the info, and TYVM.
    – Richard

  6. I just made these today and omg it made waaaay more than I needed! Lol it made a total of 52 oz! I think I’m going to have to use trusty ol Google and my math skills to cut the recipe into like a quarter… cuz I’ll be making these in much smaller batches! Also I used pink food colouring in the quantity you listed but they came out a much darker pink.. so I may cut that in half next time too! 🙂 Thanks for the recipe! Can’t wait to use some tonight!

    1. Yes, just be careful not to activate the citric acid with the liquid food coloring. Hope that helps!

  7. I found myself giggling and laughing – feel like I am running parallel with you! I swore I was going to do these and sell them in my salon – and I’ve ended up with just having my boys use them after football practice….. I had to delete the app Poshmark from my phone – I ambien shop for clothes!! So glad I am not the only one!

  8. On the Magnesium, how long did it take before it really started to work? My husband is a nightly Ambien taker and has agreed to try the Magnesium instead. So far he has had a very sleepless week. 🙁 He is taking 2 of the Magnesium Citrate that you recommend which is what the label said is the RDA. Just curious if you had any more info or tips about it.

    1. Is he taking magnesium citrate? And did he quit the Ambien cold turkey? Both of those might be factors. I feel the magnesium right away, but he may need a little more (but I am NOT a doctor, so maybe he should mention it to his! 🙂 )

  9. Has anyone tried a different scent? I was thinking of using lavendar oil and purple food coloring, but I have no idea! Thoughts?

    1. I haven’t tried yet, but today I plan to do Eucalyptus/Spearmint and green coloring. I was considering lavender, I think it would be great. I’ll let you know if disaster strikes me. 🙂

  10. Not sure if this was mentioned before: I just made a batch. If you are doing this for the first time, turn on your kitchen exhaust fan first. Or open a window. The epsom salt powder in the bottom of the bag, plus the citric acid dust, is not too kind to your sinuses. Not horrible, but enough that I had wished I had the exhaust fan on before I started. Other than that, easy peasy 🙂

  11. I made these tonight and total cost was just over $1 per 4 oz. jar! What a nice way to gift a pretty, homemade gift without breaking the bank. (I found a 7.5 oz bottle of citric acid in the canning aisle of Wal-mart that measured exactly 1 cup!) Also printed off your cute labels and put them on cute matching construction paper to attach with a ribbon! Thanks so much for such a creative idea!

  12. This post was hilarious. I was laughing out loud. I’m gonna try to make these. And thank you so much for the gift tags. Perfection! I’m excited!

    1. You can…but the scent won’t be as strong and you’ll run the risk of activating the chemical reaction. Hope that helps!