Skillet Lasagna + Reynolds Heat & Eat

I have a deep and abiding love for lasagna. On my seventeenth birthday, my parents asked me what I wanted to do for dinner and I’m serious, I told them I wanted to have dinner at home with my family and a few of my best friends. And that I wanted lasagna. Homemade cheesy, meaty lasagna. And I think it was probably my best, most favorite birthday. Maybe ever. I like to think the lasagna played a major role in that (and, you know, being surrounded by all the people in the world I loved the most, but whatever.)

I also have a deep and abiding love for leftovers. I know there are people who don’t like them and even people who won’t eat them and I just don’t understand because leftovers mean that’s one meal I don’t have to plan, shop for, cook, and clean up after. “But Kate,” you say, “You have a cooking blog! Surely you rejoice in cooking all the meals.” It’s true that I do enjoy cooking, I don’t enjoy the planning or the shopping or the cleaning up, and really, at any given 4:30 pm, all I really want to do is lock myself in the bathroom with caffeine and a pair of ear plugs.

Much like most soups, lasagna makes for fantastic leftovers; it’s one of those things that tastes just as good (if not better) the second time around. But the problem with most lasagna recipes is that they’re quite time intensive. Even if you’re not making your own from-scratch sauce, you do have to brown meat and simmer things and mix and layer and bake and sometimes if you get really lucky, you get to boil the noodles first. It ends up being a sink-full-of-dishes, hours-long experience. Which means I might make lasagna once a year. Maybe.

Enter skillet lasagna–start to finish, it’s going to take about 30-40 minutes. No noodle pre-boiling, no layering, no baking. Just a single-pan meal that your family will ask for again and again. Edited to add that while I got this recipe from a friend and modified it to suit my own tastes (read: more cheese is almost always the answer), a few readers mentioned that it looked like an America’s Test Kitchen recipe. I checked my ATK cookbooks, and sure enough, the recipe I got from my friend was very similar to one in their Cook’s Country Cookbook. So while I didn’t originally find it there, and while I made some noticeable changes, I feel comfortable saying it was adapted from ATK.

Skillet Lasagna from Our Best Bites

And then the leftovers? Check out these Reynolds Heat & Eat containers:

Reynolds Heat and Eat Containers

These plant-based containers are perfect (and safe) for storing and re-heating leftovers (especially tomato-based leftovers that have the tendency to discolor your plastic storage containers and leave some funky odors behind). If you’ve ever wished you could stash those swanky restaurant to-go containers in your kitchen, now is your chance.

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They’re a great, inexpensive way to store leftovers (or deliver meals to a friend), plus they’re recyclable. I mean…what’s not to love? They’re also perfect for delivering cookies, brownies, and other baked goods (the domed lid is especially great for frosted items–no more foil ruining your perfect cupcake frosting swirls!) as well as storing pre-made salads, fruits, and veggies.

Anyway. Back to the life-changing skillet lasagna. To get started, you’re going to need some olive oil, a pinch of red pepper flakes, some ground beef (I like 90% lean sirloin), Italian sausage (remove the casings if you’re using links), an onion, and a whole lotta garlic. Because that’s how we do things around here.

skillet lasagna
In a large skillet that has an accompanying lid, heat the olive oil over medium heat. When hot, add the onion, garlic, and red pepper flakes. Cook for 3-4 minutes, stirring frequently, until the onions are tender and the garlic is fragrant. Crumble the ground beef and Italian sausage into the skillet, sprinkle with 1/2 teaspoon of kosher salt, and cook, stirring frequently, until the meat is completely cooked.

While the onions are cooking, bust open a large can of crushed tomatoes with basil and a small can of Italian tomato sauce, and round up 8 of those long, traditional, curly-edged lasagna noodles.

skillet lasagna-2

When the meat is done cooking, break the noodles into 1-2″ pieces and spread over the meat layer. Add the water, crushed tomatoes, and tomato sauce. Bring to a boil, then cover with the lid, reduce heat to a simmer, and cook, stirring occasionally, for 20 minutes or until the noodles are cooked al dente.

While the noodles are cooking, get the cheese layer (aka the whole reason why we eat lasagna) together–you’ll need ricotta, mozzarella, and parmesan cheeses, plus some more kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper.

Skillet lasagna ingredients

combine the ricotta, 1/2 cup of parmesan, and 1/2 cup of mozzarella cheeses with 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt and 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper.

skillet lasagna-7 When the pasta is completely cooked, dollop the ricotta cheese mixture over the meat and noodle mixture and sprinkle with the reserved parmesan and mozzarella. Remove from heat and cover the pan for 4-5 minutes or until the ricotta mixture softens and the other cheeses melt. Top with chopped fresh basil and serve with a tossed green salad for a quick, easy weeknight meal!

skillet lasagna from Our Best Bites

To save and/or share your leftovers, these Reynolds Heat and Eat containers are perfect for this kind of thing.

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Pop some skillet lasagna in one container, a salad in another, and you have the perfect pick-me-up for a friend or a special lunch for your kid’s favorite teacher. Or pack it along with you to work for a lunch that will turn a few heads (in the best way possible, not in the who-packed-fish-for-lunch-again way.)

skillet lasagna-11

Skillet Lasagna from Our Best Bites

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Skillet Lasagna


Description

This quick, easy, hearty, and satisfying stovetop lasagna will quickly become one of your family favorites!


Ingredients

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

1 medium white onion, chopped

6 cloves garlic, minced

pinch of red pepper flakes

1/2 pound 10% lean ground sirloin

1/2 pound Italian sausage (if using link sausage, remove the casings)

1 teaspoon kosher salt, divided

910 traditional curly-edged lasagna noodles (not no boil, not flat, just regular lasagna noodles)

1 cup water

1 28-ounce can crushed tomatoes with basil

1 8-ounce can Italian tomato sauce (with basil and oregano or Italian spices)

16 ounces ricotta cheese

1 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese, divided

1 cup mozzarella cheese, divided

1/4 teaspoon black pepper

1/4 cup thinly sliced fresh basil


Instructions

In a large skillet that has an accompanying lid, heat the olive oil over medium heat. When hot, add the onion, garlic, and red pepper flakes. Cook for 3-4 minutes, stirring frequently, until the onions are tender and the garlic is fragrant. Crumble the ground beef and Italian sausage into the skillet, sprinkle with 1/2 teaspoon of kosher salt, and cook, stirring frequently, until the meat is completely cooked.

Break the lasagna noodles into 1-2″ pieces and spread over the meat layer. Add the water, crushed tomatoes, and tomato sauce. Bring to a boil, then cover with the lid, reduce heat to a simmer, and cook, stirring occasionally, for 20 minutes or until the noodles are cooked al dente.

While the noodles are cooking, combine the ricotta, 1/2 cup of parmesan, and 1/2 cup of mozzarella cheeses with 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt and 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper. When the pasta is completely cooked, dollop the ricotta cheese mixture over the meat and noodle mixture and sprinkle with the reserved parmesan and mozzarella. Remove from heat and cover the pan for 4-5 minutes or until the ricotta mixture softens and the other cheeses melt. Top with chopped fresh basil and serve.



Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 8

This post was published in partnership with Reynolds Heat & Eat, but all thoughts, opinions, food-related trips down memory lane, etc. are our own.

40 comments

  1. HI! This is cooking and smelling great! Quick question – Can the noodle pieces overlap? I wasn’t sure, so I only used like 5 of them because I wanted to make sure they cook. Thought I would ask for next time. Thanks!

  2. I made this for dinner a couple of days ago. It was amazing! The only swap – out I did was to use spaghetti noodles instead of lasagna noodles because we’re moving in 2 weeks & I’m trying to use up the food in my pantry. It will be even better when I make it next time following the recipe exactly. Thanks for this wonderful recipe!

  3. I also have made the ATK version of this and like it a lot. An even lazier version (which you might not be able to call lasagna, but maybe would have to name skillet ravioli) is to make the sauce, a little less water, and add fresh or frozen ravioli, sprinkle with cheese and basil.

  4. I recognize this recipe from the America’s Test Kitchen! I LOVE this recipe, and I change up the cheeses just like you did!I always mix in mozzarella and parmesan and parsely too! Haven’t ever used sausage in it, though. 🙂

  5. Looks and sounds delicious. I’m sure the answer to this is a resounding “No” since it’s not in the recipe and would make for a less fast-lane dinner, but, do you drain the grease from the skillet after browning the meat? Love your blog!

    1. It depends on your personal preferences and how fatty your meat is. If everything is drowning in grease, go ahead and drain it really quickly, but if the grease situation isn’t too bad, you don’t need to worry about it. Super specific, right?! Ha. 🙂

  6. Hi there. So my favorite component of lasagna is the layers of noodles stacked on each other–or at least Lots of noodles. But seeing as I’ve only ever made lasagna once in my life, the skillet idea is a winner! Does using 10 make it pretty noodle-y? or if I added more would I need to add water and/or more sauce? And thank you for your recipes. It’s the one place where I can always find something that will hit the spot!

  7. I have been making this recipe for years – found in the America’s Test Kitchen Family Cookbook. I have added zucchini before and its great in there. I saute it with the other veggies. I also use Campanelle noodles instead of broken lasagna noodles. They have the curly edges like lasagna noodles do and they are so cute too! Also, I hate breaking the noodles as little shards always fly across the kitchen so the campanelle solve that problem too! Thanks for adding this recipe to your blog – its a keeper!

  8. Lasagna has been my birthday dinner request almost every year since I was a little girl. I’ve never understood why people think it’s so complicated, but I don’t put ricotta in mine so I guess it’s one less step (and always use oven ready noodles!) I’ve always wanted to try a skillet version though! I’ve very intrigued by those containers, do they come in various sizes? I’m thinking that a single serving size would be handy for bringing my grandmother meals, or for a husband who forgets to take lunchcan containers home!

    1. Yep, they come in different sizes–right now, there’s one that’s longer and skinner and another that’s deeper and more square-ish. Really, either one could work for a single serving, but they’re big enough to hold a few servings of leftovers. Which sounds more ambiguous than it actually is…if you saw the containers, you’d know what I meant, haha!

  9. Hey Kate! This looks so good. Any ideas for making it meatless? Just skip the meat step? Would you keep all of the other ingredient amounts the same? I suppose you could also add in veggies in place of the meat…. Your advice would be great!

  10. I need to take a few meals to someone and thought these containers looked perfect! I ran to walmart today but couldn’t find them. Where did you get yours?

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