Creamy Stovetop Smashed Potatoes

Growing up, mashed potatoes were a big deal. My dad took (takes) his mashed potatoes very seriously. They were always made from scratch, from peeled russet potatoes, whipped with an electric mixer until they’re light and fluffy and silky smooth. They’re heavenly. They’re up there with my all-time top 5 comfort foods. If that’s what you want to make out, check out this post (or this much older one).

The thing is, making them is quite an ordeal. The peeling. The boiling. The draining. The whipping. There are a lot of recipes where I’d love to serve them with some mashed potatoes, but the thought of dirtying at least 3 large dishes that have to be hand washed (the pot, the colander, and the mixing bowl) make me want to order a pizza instead. Which is a shame, because, like I said, I love potatoes.

Years ago, we had some neighbors from Idaho who insisted mashed potatoes should be lumpy and I could not get on board, especially the way they made them. But as I’ve experimented more in the kitchen, I’ve learned that there is absolutely a time and place for lumpy potatoes, so much that rustic, creamy smashed potatoes have become one of my favorite side dishes.

However, I had to change a few things about how I made my potatoes.

  • Russets are great for baked or whipped potatoes because of their texture, but they are a little mealy and flavorless. This is a great time to use smooth, buttery baby potatoes.
  • Just because these potatoes have texture doesn’t mean they are dry. You still want them to be creamy and smooth. You can use some butter plus milk or buttermilk (for a sour cream-like flavor) to get the texture you want.
  • These potatoes are perfect with butter, milk, and salt & pepper OR for mixing in garlic, herbs, cheese, onions, bacon pieces, etc. Keep them as simple or as fancy as you’d like! The heartier texture holds up to add-ins better than creamy, silky-smooth, fluffy mashed potatoes.

For a family of 4-5, you’ll need about 1 1/2 pounds of baby potatoes, along with salt and pepper, butter, and buttermilk or milk.

Rinse (if necessary–some come pre-washed) and place in a large pot. Cover the potatoes with cold water 1″ past the tops of the potatoes. Add a generous pinch of salt. Bring the pot to a boil and cook for 15-20 minutes or until the potatoes are easily broken apart with a fork (if you undercook the potatoes, they’ll be pasty and gross. It’s hard to overcook them.)

Drain the potatoes

and then transfer back to the pot. Add 3-4 tablespoons of butter and begin mashing with the back of a fork to incorporate the butter.

When the potatoes are semi-mashed and the butter has been worked into the potatoes,

add the buttermilk or milk,

a little at a time,

until the desired texture and consistency is reached. Season with salt and pepper. If desired, add desired mix-ins–chopped garlic, green onions, grated cheddar cheese, Parmesan cheese, bacon bits, chives, and rosemary (not all at once) are great options! See notes below for flavor combination ideas.

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Creamy Stovetop Smashed Potatoes

  • Author: kate jones

Description

If you think mashed potatoes are only for special occasions, think again! These delicious rustic Creamy Stovetop Smashed Potatoes take a fraction of the time (and the dirty dishes)!


Scale

Ingredients

1 1/2 pounds baby yellow, white, or red potatoes
34 tablespoons butter
Buttermilk or milk (amount depends on preference, but most likely 1/4-1/2 cup)
Salt and pepper to taste
Mix-ins (as desired–see notes below)


Instructions

Rinse the potatoes (if necessary–some come pre-washed) and place in a large pot. Cover the potatoes with cold water 1″ past the tops of the potatoes. Add a generous pinch of salt. Bring the pot to a boil and cook for 15-20 minutes or until the potatoes are easily broken apart with a fork (if you undercook the potatoes, they’ll be pasty and gross. It’s hard to overcook them.)

Drain the potatoes and then transfer back to the pot. Add 3-4 tablespoons of butter and begin mashing with the back of a fork to incorporate the butter. When the potatoes are semi-mashed and the butter has been worked into the potatoes, add the buttermilk or milk, a little at a time, until the desired texture and consistency is reached. Season with salt and pepper. If desired, add desired mix-ins–chopped garlic, green onions, grated cheddar cheese, Parmesan cheese, bacon bits, chives, and rosemary (not all at once) are great options! See notes below for flavor combination ideas.


Notes

MIX-IN IDEAS

Loaded Potato

  • Use buttermilk instead of milk
  • Chopped bacon
  • Chopped green onions
  • Grated cheddar cheese

Garlic-Herb

  • 3-4 cloves minced garlic
  • Chopped rosemary or chives
  • Freshly shredded parmesan cheese

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